Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

Comment posted Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery by Murdoch MacKenzie.

Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

Recent comments by Murdoch MacKenzie

  • ‘And how much would this have cost an independent Scotland?’
    Thank God indeed, many typical Scottish persons of my generation and background are pushing up daisies instead of having the good fortune to continue to work and bolster the uncaring Westminster Exchequer.
    If not being typical means caring about the well being of those less able, or less fortunate in the struggle to live meaningful, working lives then I prefer to not be typical.
  • ‘And how much would this have cost an independent Scotland?’
    Mathematics and budgeting suggest to me that I have been loaded with a share of the national debt of at least £70,000 under Westminster’s governance since we paid off their last debt with our oil money less than fifteen years ago.
    The only way out for those of us who have worked and saved all our lives is to see the value of our wealth de-valued.
    The people who voted to keep us tied into this self destructing system of wasteful borrowing are the biggest problem we face and not the price of oil. Having our own oil and gas means that we are self sufficient in energy no matter what the spot prices are. It’s how we would have used that energy for our own benefit that makes the difference. A springboard for development in an Independent Scotland, or a cushioning buffer in our headfirst, debt creating, present existence at Westminster.
  • Gigha community ownership on brink of failure
    Yes indeed and he just used it an hour ago on another For Argyll thread.
    Sitting here in my jungle abode, thousands of miles away, it’s good to know that you do take cognisance of my comments even though we seldom agree.
    I can assure you though that I have no link to this other chap that riles you so.
  • ‘And how much would this have cost an independent Scotland?’
    Of course the anti-Scots will come out with this one-liner as it is so much easier than facing reality.
    Most of Scotland’s oil and gas was given away at rock bottom prices for two main reasons, in fact a lot of the gas was burned into the sky in a feeding frenzy on the oil.
    The first reason was to destroy the power of the OPEC cartel and the second was to pay off bankrupt Britain’s debt.
    Despite the philanthropy of the ScotBrits we have now turned full circle. Middle east oil and American Shale Oil is now used to fight a political and financial war against Russia and it’s BRICS partners in the struggle to maintain the US Global hegemony and the mighty petrodollar, and of course, that whore Britannia, whose debts we had cleared by the ninety’s, has now run up debts that all the oil in the world will never pay off.
  • Gordon Brown to stand down from Westminster at General Election
    The question I have is, did he make his announcement before or after hearing the news that the ex Prime Minister of Portugal, Jose Socrates, had been arrested on corruption charges?
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9 Responses to Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

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  2. There was comment at the time of the fire that the Yeoman ships have the conveyor boom operating from the stern end, immediately in front of (and attached to) the bridge/accommodation block with the engine room below, whereas there are other ships of this type with the conveyor boom operating from the bow, with less risk to the ship in the event of a conveyor belt fire. Easy to be wise after the event, but food for thought.

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    • As you can see from the photographs, the boom belt assembly is mounted at the accommodation tower – and the lift belt from the bottom belt the cargo holds discharge onto runs up the front face of the accommodation unit.

      Lay logic – but I guess this is the only position that lets them get the height for the lift belt to rise enough to discharge adequately on to the conveyor boom on the necessary volume/speed axis in unloading.

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  4. Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
    The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. The 3 newest Yeoman vessels, all have the elevator belt & tower situated next to the main superstructure. Yeoman Brook, the oldest of the fleet, & the CSL vessels that also visit Glensanda have them near the bow.
    It may be that having the tower near the accommodation block gives an improved view ahead, or it may be that it means that there’s better weight distribution & easier routing of services when everything is near the engines. I guess only the designers will be able to give the definitive answer!

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