Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

Comment posted Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery by Murdoch MacKenzie.

Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

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9 Responses to Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

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  2. There was comment at the time of the fire that the Yeoman ships have the conveyor boom operating from the stern end, immediately in front of (and attached to) the bridge/accommodation block with the engine room below, whereas there are other ships of this type with the conveyor boom operating from the bow, with less risk to the ship in the event of a conveyor belt fire. Easy to be wise after the event, but food for thought.

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    • As you can see from the photographs, the boom belt assembly is mounted at the accommodation tower – and the lift belt from the bottom belt the cargo holds discharge onto runs up the front face of the accommodation unit.

      Lay logic – but I guess this is the only position that lets them get the height for the lift belt to rise enough to discharge adequately on to the conveyor boom on the necessary volume/speed axis in unloading.

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  4. Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
    The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. The 3 newest Yeoman vessels, all have the elevator belt & tower situated next to the main superstructure. Yeoman Brook, the oldest of the fleet, & the CSL vessels that also visit Glensanda have them near the bow.
    It may be that having the tower near the accommodation block gives an improved view ahead, or it may be that it means that there’s better weight distribution & easier routing of services when everything is near the engines. I guess only the designers will be able to give the definitive answer!

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