Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

Comment posted Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery by Murdoch MacKenzie.

Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

Recent comments by Murdoch MacKenzie

  • Stuart Hill challenges Supreme Court to test security of jurisdiction for Shetland
    I voted YES.
  • Stuart Hill challenges Supreme Court to test security of jurisdiction for Shetland
    Tell the truth and shame the devil. This post is what you hope will happen, your glee stands out.
    You see this country as your (rich man’s) playground. You do not care one jot for the future of the young people now in education, training or in paid work.

    There has been more than one oil crises over the life of the North Sea and there are still companies who see a great future there. Everyone who can read and search out good information knows that this latest, politically instigated, crises will stabilise like they all do. If Premier Oil survive they will be back to develop their untapped or remaining assets, if they don’t then there will be no shortage of companies who will take over.

    ETA The SNP have no control over North Sea Oil, have you forgotten that you voted to keep it with Westminster. You’re not Keiza Dugdale, are you?

  • Jim Murphy’s dilemmas
    You certainly can mate, the SNP, nor anyone else, have no control over what I think.
  • Jim Murphy’s dilemmas
    Fuel Poverty, Richard? We are as fuel rich as any country could possibly be. We just need to cast off the albatross and get on with using it for our own benefit. Oil, Gas, Hydro, Nuclear, Coal, Peat, Bio Mass, Wind, Tide, Solar, ad infinitum.
    You’ve moved to the Garden of Eden but you did not leave your bitterness behind.
  • Jim Murphy’s dilemmas
    Richard, maybe you should consider what you are saying before making your third-person, personal attacks on others’ views.

    It’s not that Grangemouth does not want North Sea products per se, it’s that it has contracted to buy US shale gas for it’s petro chemical processes. Now, I don’t know if they have already agreed their prices which means that they are tied into costs that will be above what other producers are now paying, or if their prices are based on market Spot prices.
    Their buying of licences for fracking in Central Scotland and their loan guarantees from the government could see Grangemouth being used as a big lever to overcome any resistance to fracking in Central Scotland.

powered by SEO Super Comments

9 Responses to Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

  1. Pingback: Argyll News: Glensanda superquarry: a world beyond imagining | For Argyll

  2. There was comment at the time of the fire that the Yeoman ships have the conveyor boom operating from the stern end, immediately in front of (and attached to) the bridge/accommodation block with the engine room below, whereas there are other ships of this type with the conveyor boom operating from the bow, with less risk to the ship in the event of a conveyor belt fire. Easy to be wise after the event, but food for thought.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • As you can see from the photographs, the boom belt assembly is mounted at the accommodation tower – and the lift belt from the bottom belt the cargo holds discharge onto runs up the front face of the accommodation unit.

      Lay logic – but I guess this is the only position that lets them get the height for the lift belt to rise enough to discharge adequately on to the conveyor boom on the necessary volume/speed axis in unloading.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Pingback: Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery – For Argyll | Cost To Ship

  4. Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
    The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. The 3 newest Yeoman vessels, all have the elevator belt & tower situated next to the main superstructure. Yeoman Brook, the oldest of the fleet, & the CSL vessels that also visit Glensanda have them near the bow.
    It may be that having the tower near the accommodation block gives an improved view ahead, or it may be that it means that there’s better weight distribution & easier routing of services when everything is near the engines. I guess only the designers will be able to give the definitive answer!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  6. Pingback: De Yeomannen | Er was eens…

  7. Pingback: Argyll News: Transport Select Committee takes the pants off Dad’s Army coastguard modernisation plans | For Argyll

  8. Pingback: Light at the end of the tunnel :-) | Life at the end of the road

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


All the latest comments (including yours) straight to your mailbox, everyday! Click here to subscribe.