I do agree with wind power has a …

Comment posted Campbeltown rumours about Wind Towers declared unfounded by John Sinclair.

I do agree with wind power has a place in our energy production, and manufacturing the plant in Scotland is worthwhile employment.
BUT just because I am pro wind power, I still listen to the other people views, and accept both sides are giving out misleading information to undermine the other side. Now what’s worthwhile employment, not everyone can be employed full time in the manufacturing of windmills, so what are other types of worthwhile employment. Is it better to have one big employer or many small employment opportunities. Should we optimise the resources or maximise the output. Too often an argument is over single issues, should we not be looking at the whole picture.

John Sinclair also commented

  • watched the clip, still pro wind power, you are highlighting a very valid point about subsidies and I too get annoyed about those figures and alarmed that the pro wind power can not be more transparent about true costs. On a bigger scale, if we did not spend money on WMD and wage illegal wars, we could use all that resource and technology to give us all a better lifestyle, even sort out our roads and ferries in Argyll.
  • I may not agree with your view on wind power, it does have a roll to play in power generation.
    Totally agree with “let’s focus on worthwhile employment”, I am sure there will be a debate about what “worthwhile employment” is, but it would be a step forward for sustainable living, whats sustainable living.
  • The logistic of moving commodities is a a very important issue, the lack of investment for the maintenance of the roads is an issue along with the size of commercial vehicles using them. S.White was just highlighting this in his/her way. We all need an income to support our selves, Scotland has a vast potential, harness that and we could all have a good lifestyle.

Recent comments by John Sinclair

  • The independence campaign: personal gains and loss
    Read my older posts Karl, you might just get a inkling of were I am going from were I have come.
    And for you Richard grow up for once, grow a pair of yesticles, your antics no longer have any amusement value left, enjoy snuggling into your processions. And finally this comment is for Robert, just go out and buy a bigger car, and then buy a bigger car, you will never ever be happy, you have no love in you, no happiness. They are not my words they are from a man whose house is
    filled with happiness and caring and love for everyone.“I lost the friends that needed losing / found others on the way.”
  • The independence campaign: personal gains and loss
    Karl what do I deserve, come on spit it out, if I give it I should be able to take it. Come on then what do I deserve, let everyone known, is your true personality coming out now. Just say it you will feel a lot better.
  • The independence campaign: personal gains and loss
    “now stop your nonsense”
    Strange, the Yes movement has driven that change you are talking about, without it the ruling hands of Westminster would still have a firm grip round all our throats, we are prising them away to let us all breath clearly once again. Some people are so selfish, just me,me,me.
  • The independence campaign: personal gains and loss
    Got to go, enjoy working abroad and using Scotland as a hotel and play thing when you pop back. We want change, we want a good future for the generations to come. We will put a stop to the export trade of the youth because there’s no hope left in their home nation. This is due to the greed of Westminster. Change is here, the yes movement has driven it, there is a society here we need each other we are on that road.
  • The independence campaign: personal gains and loss
    “Remember the silent Jnr…which way will they vote YOU do not know…”
    Talk of 97% register to vote, talk of 80% plus voting, a big block of people who didn’t even have a voice have registered to vote, many for the first time in their adult life. They are not going to stay silent for much longer.

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32 Responses to I do agree with wind power has a …

    • The subsidy for onshore wind has just been cut by 10%

      Subsidies are designed to be temporary and to allow for the R&D costs of new technologies. Onshore wind should be subsidy free before the end of the decade.

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      • Subsidies for on and offshore wind are not, however, being cut in Scotland.

        The First Minister issued a recent declaration that they would be retained here in full.

        The announcement of a 10% reduction in onshore development subsidies(there was pressure for 25%)was a UK government announcement for England and Wales.

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        • Interesting – Scottish & Southern have said that they’re cancelling their planned hydro power projects because of the subsidy cut, so is Holyrood differentiating between wind and hydro power?

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          • newsroom – the Scottish Government has not yet announced the results of its own review of the RO banding, but the First Minister has said that the new (10% reduced) rate of 0.9 for onshore wind will be guaranteed for four years in Scotland. The DECC meanwhile has said the 0.9 rate is only guaranteed until 2014 in England & Wales, and will then be reviewed again – doubtless this was the price for keeping the treasury happy – they had apparently wanted 25% from the start.

            DECC announced a cut of 30% for large (>5MW) hydro, but the Scottish Government’s consultation document (Oct 11) proposes 50%.

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        • Subsidies for on and offshore wind are not, however, being cut in Scotland.

          Newsroom, at the risk of sounding like Simon, you really must stop making stuff up and presenting it as fact.

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  1. On the other hand, if the rumours ARE true, then it is also good news. No more convoys of enormous windmill components trundling up and down our inadequate roads, knocking the stuffing out of them, causing traffic congestion, and diverting our police from their proper duties. And all paid for by us taxpayers.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  2. S.White. How often do you actually witness this? Most turbines are transported to the harbour in Campbeltown and then transported by boat.
    “If the rumours ARE true, then it is also good news” ??? What a ridiculous statement. What about people employed directly or indirectly at Machrihanish. I’m sure they will love to go home and tell their wife and weans that “sorry, I’ve not got a job but the good news is there will be no traffic congestion on the roads”!
    Lets start a campaign to get the log lorries off the roads. The milk tankers, the co-op and tesco lorries and while we are at lets stop those mindless tourists trailing their caravans. In fact, lets cut off Kintyre all together and let it die! Doh!!

    The truth of the rumour is Marsh have hit problems. The good news is SSH are about to take complete ownership of the factory over. ;-)

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    • The logistic of moving commodities is a a very important issue, the lack of investment for the maintenance of the roads is an issue along with the size of commercial vehicles using them. S.White was just highlighting this in his/her way. We all need an income to support our selves, Scotland has a vast potential, harness that and we could all have a good lifestyle.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. In my opinion no job is worth the destruction of our environment by an inefficient energy industry that adds significantly to fuel poverty.

    I agree that employment is an extremely important issue, perhaps crucially so in Campbeltown, but let’s focus on worthwhile employment and not an industry that causes so much damage and distress to those who have to live with the consequences.

    No doubt Scots Renewbles will think differently!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • I may not agree with your view on wind power, it does have a roll to play in power generation.
      Totally agree with “let’s focus on worthwhile employment”, I am sure there will be a debate about what “worthwhile employment” is, but it would be a step forward for sustainable living, whats sustainable living.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. For Hughie -

    I haven’t actually kept a log of the number of times I’ve had to pull over onto a rough and crumbling road verge, inches from a half hidden suspension busting ditch, to avoid a windmill. But it has happened far too often.

    Comparing them to Tesco, Coop, milk lorries is silly. These vehicles transport cargo of intrinsic value which we all require, food. Neither do they require police escorts, so they don’t waste valuable police time.

    As Lowry points out, employment is an important issue. But it makes no sense, economic or moral, to create jobs for a few windmill makers by adding to the fuel poverty of the entire country.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • @ S.White – Where do you live when “it has happened far too often”? I travel the road to Glasgow three or four times a day every week and can count on one hand the number of times it has caused me to slow down and pull over and that is over a few years. In fact in recent weeks I’ve had to slow down to allow static caravans to be transported. But hey ho lets moan about them too. :-)

      The pros and cons about wind turbines is another argument but you can rest assure the continued employment of hundreds of people in Kintyre is fundamental to our area. As Simon says “Have a nice day” :-)

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. For John Sinclair – if you agree that wind power has a role to play in power production, and most people do, then what could be more ‘worthwhile employment’ in an economically-distressed area like South Kintyre than to make the hardware locally rather than importing it from overseas manufacturers?

    Perhaps those who would cheer at the thought of the (thankfully unlikely-sounding) loss of this factory could suggest what might be a ‘worthwhile’ way to replace the jobs lost in skilled manufacturing.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • I do agree with wind power has a place in our energy production, and manufacturing the plant in Scotland is worthwhile employment.
      BUT just because I am pro wind power, I still listen to the other people views, and accept both sides are giving out misleading information to undermine the other side. Now what’s worthwhile employment, not everyone can be employed full time in the manufacturing of windmills, so what are other types of worthwhile employment. Is it better to have one big employer or many small employment opportunities. Should we optimise the resources or maximise the output. Too often an argument is over single issues, should we not be looking at the whole picture.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • watched the clip, still pro wind power, you are highlighting a very valid point about subsidies and I too get annoyed about those figures and alarmed that the pro wind power can not be more transparent about true costs. On a bigger scale, if we did not spend money on WMD and wage illegal wars, we could use all that resource and technology to give us all a better lifestyle, even sort out our roads and ferries in Argyll.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  6. Malcolm Kirk – interesting figures indeed. It would also be interesting to know how much energy is CONSUMED in the manufacturing and installation of these machines, including all the incidentals, e.g. building access roads into the hillsides, the decommissioning costs, building the pylons and cabling required to connect them to the grid, etc etc.

    Logically, these energy costs should be subtracted from the energy output of the turbines in order to arrive at a true picture of their efficiency, whether measured in £s or kilowatts. Until we know these figures, we really can’t tell whether wind turbines actually produce a net amount of energy at all!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Until we know these figures

      These calculations have all been done and the results can be discovered by anyone with a moderate aptitude for using Google.

      Hard facts trump idle speculation every day.

      Of course, if you are going to include EVERY factor then other fuel sources must bear the same burden – eg transport of gas and oil in tankers, millennium-long storage of nuclear waste, the energy cost to the NHS of sick miners – the list is endless.

      Happy Googling :-)

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • One figure that I wonder about is the energy consumed in delivering the turbines being installed above Stronachullin, south of Ardrishaig. Although the towers are fabricated at Machrihanish, the turbines start their journey at Hohhot, Inner Mongolia. (I’m not making this up)

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