The difficulty with using the TA is the …

Comment posted Axed Argylls deployed to Olympic Games security by newsroom.

The difficulty with using the TA is the impact on the economy of employers losing 3,500 staff at short notice.

This part time nature of TA membership and the impact on businesses of using it at a serious level, also casts doubt on the achieveability of the MoD’s plan to double its size and use it more intensively in theatres of war, with the new slimmed down army.

Recent comments by newsroom

  • Clyde RIver ferry: Business Scotland interview with CalMac’s Martin Dorchester
    Bit of a ‘Doh’ moment. Confess to having forgotten that it’s an amphibian simply because of knowing it only as taking off and landing on the water.
    Being on the tarmac at Glasgow would make it a very seductive experience for both golf and scenery packages.
  • Clyde RIver ferry: Business Scotland interview with CalMac’s Martin Dorchester
    Absolutely – and getting as close to Glasgow Green as possible for The People’s Palace…
    As a city defined by the river, Glasgow turns its back on it to the point that very few have any idea of the city from the river and the access it would make possible in a well considered service.
  • Clyde RIver ferry: Business Scotland interview with CalMac’s Martin Dorchester
    Thank you.
    Re your airport idea – do you know if there is a viable berthing location at the airport?
    If there were and if Loch Lomond Seaplanes [or Skye Seaplanes as it now is at its new Skye base] were interested, there has always been a lure in a high-end charter pick-up service for arrivals at the airport to fly them off to Loch Lomond, Arran, Kintyre, Oban, Islay…
    So if an airport stop was achievable and the seaplane service went for this business opportunity, that would get double value from a river bus airport pontoon. It would be logical for Glasgow City Council to put in and maintain the infrastructure – under advice from experts including Brisbane City Council – and lease it to operators.
  • CalMac: the Douglas Fraser teaser
    The CalMac experience wiht CMAL over the Ballycastle-Rathline tender was one that we had originally included in this companion piece to this article and then edited out as it distracted from the main focus on CalMac’s early-days thinking about a Clyde River ferry. [http://forargyll.com/2014/04/interesting-business-scotland-interview-with-calmacs-martin-dorchester/]
    The Rathlin tender affair could not provide better evidence that the Scottish Government allowed CMAL to behave proactivey against CalMac’s interests in fighting to retain their Rathlin contract. This underlines the essential utter independence of the two state owned Scottish companies, one from another.
    The competing bid was an unable one. The bidder did not even have and could not find a boat to serve the route.
    CMAL stepped in and OFFERED him the use of the MV Canna – the very boat that CalMac was using for the service.
    This qualified the competing bid and made it look more capable. It won the contract.
    What CMAL and the Scottish Government were up to in shafting a state owned company, wholly owned by one of them and a sister of the other, also wholly state owned – is anyone’s guess. It looked very much like a backstairs political deal between the two governments concerned, with the Irish possibly interested in ‘Irishising’ the service.
    We are aware from authoritative sources in Northern Ireland that CalMac had – and knew they had – a strong legal case to challenge the award of the contract but were instructed by their sole shareholder not to do so.
    This curious incident does, though, underscore the fact that the CMAL fleet is CMAL’s asset and CMAL’s liability – and that CalMac has no ‘ownership’ or business reason to try to help out in finding ways to deploy CMAL’s upcoming surplus and ageing tonnage – an argument we make it the companion piece linked above and which just might apply in the case of the tender possibility punted as a possible CalMac itnerest in this article here.
  • Clyde RIver ferry: Business Scotland interview with CalMac’s Martin Dorchester
    As you say, it is all about the right sort of service – and you too seem to feel that the right service could work.

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3 Responses to The difficulty with using the TA is the …

  1. I don’t suppose I’m the only one to wonder what will happen in future when our army has been cut by another 20,000. Say, for example, another foot and mouth outbreak coinciding with our forces being fully committed to another of the vanity wars which seem to have become a rite of passage for our recent prime ministers. Shudder.

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  2. I do understand why officers of the British Army have to used to provide security at the Olympics. Surely members of T A could beused at a fraction of the cost.

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    • The difficulty with using the TA is the impact on the economy of employers losing 3,500 staff at short notice.

      This part time nature of TA membership and the impact on businesses of using it at a serious level, also casts doubt on the achieveability of the MoD’s plan to double its size and use it more intensively in theatres of war, with the new slimmed down army.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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