MoD announces Scottish site ruled out as host for nuclear waste from redundant submarines

Chapelcross, on the Solway Firth near Annan – the site of Scotland’s first nuclear power station in business, has been one of five possible hosts to receive and store nuclear waste in components removed from redundant submarines on decommissioning.

This includes 18 redundant aubs long parked up at Rosyth on Scotlands east coast in Fife and at the naval base of Devonport on the south coast of England; and a further nine subs still in some form of active service.

The redundant submarines cannot be decommissioned until their reactors have been removed; so the final selection now of Capenhurst in Cheshire to ac as host to this material means that decommissioning may now be ion a timeline.

Of the eighteen redundant and rotting hulks, seven are based at Rosyth and include the oldest by far of the eighteen, the 1980 Dreadnought.  The full list of seven at Rosyth is:

  • Dreadnought [commissioned 1963, decommissioned 1980 – Britain’s first nuclear powered submarine]
  • Churchill [commissioned 1970, decommissioned 1991 – the leader of the improved Valiant class of three subs]
  • 1992 Swiftsure [commissioned 1973, decommissioned 1992 – the class leader]
  • Revenge [commissioned 1969, decommissioned 1992]
  • Resolution [commissioned 1968, decommissioned 1994- the class leader]
  • Repulse [commissioned 1968, decommissioned 1996]
  • Renown [commissioned 1968, decommissioned 1996]

Devonport has:

  • 1990 Conqueror [the first British nuclear submarine to fire with intent when she controversially sank Argentina’s General Belgrano in May 1982 in the Falklands War – and came back into port in Faslane in Argyll, flying the Jolly Roger – the skull and cross bones – enhanced with torpedoes]
  • Warspite [third of Britain’s nuclear powered submarines – commissioned 1967, decommissioned 1991]
  • Courageous [commissioned 1971, decommissioned 1992]
  • Valiant [second of Britain’s nuclear powered submarine – commissioned 1966, decommissioned 1994 – the class leader]
  • Splendid [still fuelled – commissioned 1981, decommissioned 2004]
  • Sovereign [still fuelled – commissioned 1974, decommissioned 2006]
  • Spartan [still fuelled – commissioned 1979, decommissioned 2006]
  • Superb [still fuelled – commissioned 1976, decommissioned 2008]
  • Trafalgar [still fuelled – commissioned 1983, decommissioned 2009 – the class leader – and the one who ran into Skye during an officer selection exercise]
  • Sceptre [still fuelled – commissioned 1978, decommissioned 2010]
  • Turbulent [still fuelled – commissioned 1984, decommissioned 2012]
  • Tireless [still fuelled – commissioned 1985, decommissioned 2014]

Over the coming years, Devonport is also to receive four more of the Trafalgar class hunter killers:

  • Torbay [commissioned 1987, expected decommissioning 2017]
  • Trenchant [commssioned 1989, expected decommissioning 2019]
  • Talent [commissioned 1990, expected decommissioning¬† 2021]
  • Triumph [commissioned 1991, expected decommissioning 2022]

 

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Related Articles & Comments

  • Has this decision anything to do with the probable result of Indy Ref2?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1

    Dunoon Lad July 8, 2016 11:44 pm Reply
  • What sites are still being actively considered? IIRC Coulport, Cumbria and at least one other site which escapes me were in the running.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    db July 9, 2016 1:13 am Reply
    • London would be the best place for this crap…..

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

      Ian Sanderson July 9, 2016 10:16 am Reply
  • Nuclear Waste Disposal
    Fracking
    GM Crops
    Coal
    Nuclear power stations

    The list of industries that the SNP proactively work to stop in Scotland grows, meanwhile, our economy suffers.

    Stronger for Scotland? Not a chance.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 6

    JB July 9, 2016 8:02 am Reply
  • Westminster is running scared,blown by their own petard. They will be reviewing the renewal of Trident,as there is justifiable argument that Scotland will engage In a further referendum to secure Self Determination.
    For all our children’s futures,do not allow any nuclear material near Scotland’s shores,instead campaign to have it dumped in Whitehall.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 3

    A.Salmon July 9, 2016 8:08 am Reply
    • Shores like Hunterston and Torness?

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1

      keith stanger July 9, 2016 8:41 am Reply

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