Absolutely. And the weather forecast for tonight and …

Comment posted A83: Hazard warnings back in place by newsroom.

Absolutely.
And the weather forecast for tonight and tomorrow is not helpful.
We live with three negatives:
endessly checking and worrying if the road will be open in the morning/afternoon/night when you need to use it (where else do you have to do this?);
driving through that section on the Rest when the Wig Wag signs are on, knowing that ‘extreme caution’ can only mean ‘Don’t go’;
and feeling rhythms in Argyll slow and stall every time the road has to close.

Recent comments by newsroom

  • MV Loch Seaforth for Stornoway-Ullapool: a tale of public sector ‘management’
    On a point of information: you cannot refer to ‘CMAL/CalMac’ or ‘CMAL’CalMac boards’. The companies are not associated other than as supplier and client; and as being the property of the Scottish Government of the day..
    Cmal is an incorporated, supposedly ‘arms-length’, state owned company. It is a standalone, with no affiliated corporate junion or senior companies.
    Caledonian MacBrayne is an incorporated, supposedly ‘arms-length’, state owned company – but is one of the state owned David MacBrayne Limited group of companies.
    NorthLink Ferries used to be a member of this group, also as a supposedly ‘arms-length’ state owned company, until the Northern Isles Ferry Services contract was awarded instead to Serco, at which point the NorthLink brand stayed with the service and the company itself went out of existence.
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  • Ascot to Scottish Tourism Week: Argyll and the Isles Tourism Cooperative
    There is an issue here. we were unable to see the logic of the Ascot presence and our questions on the strategy involved went unanaswered.
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    That is a serious issue.
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    The SNP Scottish Government’s plan for minimum pricing of alcohol was strategic, brave and rated as a serious contributor to the address to the issue you correctly identify.
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    They fronted their campaign on the visceral romance of Scotch whisky – which was already beyond the minimum price that was planned and would have remained unaffected.
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    Diageo too played a major part in taking down the later attempt by the UK government to introduce the same ‘measure’.
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    BBC Scotland was intimidated by continuous protest from the Scottish Government [which had learned well the Alastair Campbell lessons of just how to do this] during the indy campaign and failed markedly to interrogate as it should and in the public interest, what was demonstrably a flawed prospectus. It came under SNP fire because,b while wrongly diluting its necessary independence, it did not quite make the trip to open hagiography.

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16 Responses to Absolutely. And the weather forecast for tonight and …

  1. The Western Ferries crossing of the Firth of Clyde has been mentioned on the BBC as an alternative route.

    How long can the politicians leave in place a situation where an integral part of the transport network is run by a private monopoly with no control on profits?

    They don’t even have a published set of fares for commercial vehicles.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • If you substituted ‘charges’ or ‘fares’ for ‘profits’ every time you complained about WF it’d look a bit less like your real gripe was against a company running a profitable business.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • Not at all, I want them to make a profit – just not an excessive one. If you set the fare or charges they might make a loss, I don’t want that.

        They do though provide the only vehicle crossing of the Firth of Clyde. One that we can see is important, particularly when the A83 closes. Given all the fuss over tolls on the Skye Bridge (maximum charge £6?) why it acceptable to have a private company charging £20 for a short ferry crossing (billion pound Firth of Forth bridge crossings being free to use)?

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Very few ferry companies, private or otherwise, make their rates for commercial vehicles public, and for very good reason. Just ask CalMac how much they used to charge Charlle Black for his empty bread wagons! Oh, that’s right, they got caught for that one, didn’t they?!!!

      At least Western Ferries run extra boats when the road is shut. The first time it was closed by a landslide, about 5 years ago if I recall correctly, what did CalMac do? HEE-HAW. And they had boats available to put on too.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • Why would WF not publish their commercial ferry rates?

        You say they have good reason for doing so, does that mean if they were to publish them it might encourage competition, or that local people would be shocked at the costs added to goods and services reaching them?

        Maybe the charges are really low, so why not publish?

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        • Also I just checked but, as an example, Brittany Ferries don’t charge commercial rates for vans unless they are over 6.5m but WF will charge commercial rates on a minibus (people) over 5m.

          I stuck details of a laden 7m van into a website and was quoted cross channel prices from DFS Seaways, P&O Ferries, the Channel Tunnel, Transmanche Ferries and TranEuropa. There were several more but I stopped once the cross channel price was twice what I have heard the cross Firth of Clyde price is.

          How much do WF ferries charge commercial vehicles and why don’t they publish?

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Absolutely.
      And the weather forecast for tonight and tomorrow is not helpful.
      We live with three negatives:
      endessly checking and worrying if the road will be open in the morning/afternoon/night when you need to use it (where else do you have to do this?);
      driving through that section on the Rest when the Wig Wag signs are on, knowing that ‘extreme caution’ can only mean ‘Don’t go’;
      and feeling rhythms in Argyll slow and stall every time the road has to close.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • You would have to do endless checking of weather forecasts if you want to get to work, college, hospital, the airport etc. using the passenger ferry service between Dunoon and Gourock which has bathtubs too small to cope with the weather.

        What is your problem newsroom, it is not like the A83 is the only road, surely people are spoilt for choice? Nobody has put an alternative in place so clearly there is no demand is there? Why not let a private company run the A83 and charge tolls, would you be against that if so why?

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          • I am sorry but people who use the Argyll Ferries service have to check how they are going to get to an from work on a daily basis.

            Newsroom seems to think that is unacceptable for a road, what is the difference. The solution for the ferries will cost a lot less than the eventual solution for the A83.

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          • Ferryman: one of the problems – the weather – could disrupt the daily journey to work whatever sort of ferry service you have, so there’s something about your attitude that just doesn’t add up, because when people mention the idea of a tunnel (weatherproof) you immediately look for an excuse to pour scorn on them – you’re your own worst enemy.

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        • RW: the current ferries are too small to cope with the weather that is why people are unsure, even in summer, about getting to and from work.

          I pour scorn on people who just come up with vacuous ideas. You mention tunnels but have no idea whatsoever about costs, traffic volumes etc. We might just as well discuss using airships or Star Trek transporters.

          Why are you not suggesting tunnels to solve the A83 problem, they would be under the landslides?

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          • You’re right – a tunnel would solve the landslide problem, and the road would be less vulnerable to disruption by winter weather. However, until there’s greater clarity from Transport Scotland on what their surveys and studies lead them to recommend for fixing the problem there’s no point in talking about it, unlike your situation at Dunoon where no ferry would be immune to stormy weather, making a tunnel worth considering now, before large sums of money are committed to the ferry system.

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