Every time there is a drought anywhere the …

Comment posted Scotland’s water, Scottish Water, climate change and the south east by Jim B.

Every time there is a drought anywhere the news channels prop up a reporter at a convenient almost dry reservoir. In the backgrounds are huge areas of sand and silt.

Why don’t the water companies get a JCB and a couple of lorries and dig all of it out to increase storage capacity?

Simples? I don’t know – is there a reason why they don’t?

Recent comments by Jim B

  • Audit Scotland now conducting third consecutive investigation of Argyll & Bute Council
    I agree with Malcolm, the whole situation with that development is ridiculous and should not have been permitted.

    The whole issue of Planning Consent and Building Control in A&B appears to be at best inconsistent in its application. As evidence for this I give you the Council’s list of planning applications as linked weekly on here.

    In some areas you need permission to reslate your roof, while in others you seem to be free to do what you want. Cowal being one of the latter. What do the planners in Dunoon do with their time, there are so few applications?

    Yes I am aware that Conservation areas exist and that they involve tight planning conditions,but this does not explain the lack of applications in Cowal.

  • Rothesay ferry: CMAL postpones closure of pier at Wemyss Bay
    “Scotland really has to get rid of all these subsidised ferries and ferry terminals.”

    At both Gourock and Dunoon there are waiting rooms and toilets. What does private enterprise provide for its customers ? Yes a bus shelter at both terminals and no toilets. This from an immensely profitable ferry company.

    Mind you I blame A&B and Inverclyde councils too they I am sure could have insisted on toilets as a condition of planning consent.

  • Castle Toward campaigners take note: Argyll & Bute Council is ‘working to support the ambitions of communities’
    “Ah! and But Council” – I like it. Maybe we should adopt this name on a permanent basis!
  • Last of the Streakers – CMAL announce sale of MV Saturn
    I am a bit surprised at this outcome for the Saturn. There was a drawing of the ship’s hull near the ticket office and she appeared to be quite flat bottomed to cope with the vertical Voight Schneider (sp?) propulsion units. (This means she has no screw propellers and no rudder.)

    I wouldn’t have thought that she would be a kindly boat in a rough sea.

  • Jim Murphy under pressure to confirm intentions for East Renfrewshire
    My personal observation over the last year or two is that there are fewer huge people on the streets now than there used to be. Strangely, a relly in Australia has come to the same conclusion there too.

    Maybe the tide is turning?

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9 Responses to Every time there is a drought anywhere the …

  1. The good:

    This idea was thrown around during past droughts notably the one of 1976…
    It may be the furthest distance from source, but GB has it’s industrial revolution to thank for it’s incredible canal legacy…get the water to Kendal and the network begins in ernest…

    The Bad:

    Water:Foreign ?

    The Ugly:

    Seabed: Westminster
    Oil: Westminster
    Tidal: Foreign intervention
    Wind: Foreign owned
    Electricity: Foreign owned

    Not much left for after independance is there ?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  2. You slightly beat me to the point Karl: it would indeed be daft to supply the SE of England with Scottish water but all that is needed is to move Scottish water to the North of England, then move NoE water to the Midlands, then Midlands water to the South. It is still not trivial but it is certainly feasible and how commercially viable depends on how much the SE wants water. (Though, that all said, it is probable that improvements to water capture storage and distribution in the SE would be a more sensible priority – after that is exhausted it is time to look at more radical solutions).

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    • It’s already possible to transfer water from the giant Kielder reservoir near the Scottish border from Northumberland down through Durham to South Yorkshire – a series of tunnels, pipelines and pumping stations connecting formerly separate water networks down the east side of the Pennines to feed a predicted rise in demand – notably the steel industry – that didn’t materialise.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    • Agreed to a certain point involving domestic usage…however, there is some of the best agricultural land in the UK in the SE/E of England and this may need irrigation.

      Waste: We might all want to look at waste again…as with energy waste and line loss…the UK’s water companies are notorious at loosing millions of cuM of water between source and end use.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Every time there is a drought anywhere the news channels prop up a reporter at a convenient almost dry reservoir. In the backgrounds are huge areas of sand and silt.

    Why don’t the water companies get a JCB and a couple of lorries and dig all of it out to increase storage capacity?

    Simples? I don’t know – is there a reason why they don’t?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Jim, I think regardless of how much is dug away and removed such and sand/silt there would still be a reduction of water, this would not increase the amount of water stored. So, the size of the resevoir is not the important factor here, it still requires constant water to keep levels above certain levels.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. The issue has nothing to do with a minuscule change in the climate and everything to do with increasing population and increasing water usage.

    When will journalists start checking their facts and stop blaming the climate … it’s like the “wrong kind of leaves”. Climate has always changed … it will always change, but the biggest factor on water supply is the way we use it.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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