At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of …

Comment posted Overnight closures for Connel Bridge for repairs to damage caused by high truck by Robert Wakeham.

At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of not being a regular user of the Connel Bridge (I plead guilty) I’d like to know why – to the best of my knowledge – there’s no form of overhead warning barrier that triggers stop lights if an overheight vehicle approaches the bridge? This type of ‘fail-safe’ precaution is common enough in some European countries – for example, at level crossings where there’s an overhead electric line.
In this country any construction site involving traffic under low power lines will be legally required to have ‘goalposts’, and it leaves me wondering if the trunk road authority is asleep – or maybe their managing agents get a percentage of the cost of repairing the likes of Connel Bridge? I just can’t believe that the cost of repairs – and disruption – is outweighed by the cost of fitting effective safety warnings.

Robert Wakeham also commented

  • In that case perhaps a reliable stop light system with flashing ‘overheight’ warning would be the obvious failsafe system – the flashing speed signs at the southern entrance to Inveraray and on Great Western Road near Drumchapel are very noticeable.
  • What I’ve seen in some places is a hefty steel pipe suspended from cables over the road – no electrical system to go wrong, but a driver would have to be deaf or drunk not to be aware of a ‘hit’. (having said that, I wonder what was the driver’s excuse at Connel if – as it would appear – he ploughed on for some distance after hitting the first girder?)

Recent comments by Robert Wakeham

  • Will Luing’s Atlantic Islands Centre get consent for Spanish or Slate Isles roofing slate?
    Surely we elect our councillors in the expectation that they’ll take carefully considered, informed decisions – and for the expert advice of their council officers to be withheld from them until the actual meeting seems very strange – unless there’s clear justification for this; it either leads to excessively long meetings, or maybe to decisions being ‘railroaded’ through by the administration?
  • Will Luing’s Atlantic Islands Centre get consent for Spanish or Slate Isles roofing slate?
    I think you’re wrong – if it’s down to price, then you could be accused of favouring a supplier who wasn’t the cheapest for the quality of the slate in terms of performance, but if the ‘foreign’ product doesn’t match the appearance of the local slate, then this could be a perfectly valid reason for specifying the local product, or a closer match from elsewhere in Britain, even if it’s more expensive.
    Why should specifying the traditional product involve having to plead ‘exceptional circumstances’?
  • Will Luing’s Atlantic Islands Centre get consent for Spanish or Slate Isles roofing slate?
    ‘Could only happen in Argyll’ – unfortunately not, typical of an increasing range of products that can be found in Scotland / UK, but which aren’t sourced locally in favour of transporting stuff from goodness knows where – it extends from Canadian & Chilean shellfish to Brazilian granite paving – and even IKEA, with its carefully nurtured Swedish image, is mostly stuffed with Chinese products.
  • For Argyll challenge to candidates for Thursday’s Oban North & Lorn by-election
    Surely an age-old problem with democracy – people voting for an idea (be it political party or male / female preference) first, and for a person a very distant second, thus presenting us with a substantial number of low grade politicians.
  • Trees for Life awarded £80k for conservation projects in Glen Affric
    But, overall, it was sparse – and why do you think so many small farmers have left the land in rural areas of Mediterranean countries? – a lot of it was made productive, as you’ve said, by (laboriously) building terraces and (usually) elaborate irrigation systems, but these days the only viable cultivation is for vineyards and fruit orchards.
    The only way to revive a lot of it would be to invite land-hungry third world farmers to take over – in places like Oman they still cultivate precipitous terraces in the jebel, but I doubt they’d be keen on settling in Lewis

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6 Responses to At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of …

  1. At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of not being a regular user of the Connel Bridge (I plead guilty) I’d like to know why – to the best of my knowledge – there’s no form of overhead warning barrier that triggers stop lights if an overheight vehicle approaches the bridge? This type of ‘fail-safe’ precaution is common enough in some European countries – for example, at level crossings where there’s an overhead electric line.
    In this country any construction site involving traffic under low power lines will be legally required to have ‘goalposts’, and it leaves me wondering if the trunk road authority is asleep – or maybe their managing agents get a percentage of the cost of repairing the likes of Connel Bridge? I just can’t believe that the cost of repairs – and disruption – is outweighed by the cost of fitting effective safety warnings.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • What I’ve seen in some places is a hefty steel pipe suspended from cables over the road – no electrical system to go wrong, but a driver would have to be deaf or drunk not to be aware of a ‘hit’. (having said that, I wonder what was the driver’s excuse at Connel if – as it would appear – he ploughed on for some distance after hitting the first girder?)

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • There is also a physical bar to warn drivers but with the lorries stereo on full you might not notice it even if you do hit it. Drivers are supposed to know what the height of their vehicles are and read the signs.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        • In that case perhaps a reliable stop light system with flashing ‘overheight’ warning would be the obvious failsafe system – the flashing speed signs at the southern entrance to Inveraray and on Great Western Road near Drumchapel are very noticeable.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          • As linnhe says, there is a recently-installed system of vehicle height sensors linked to NADIX-type display boards/flashing lights, but there have been some ‘teething troubles’ with these.

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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