At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of …

Comment posted Overnight closures for Connel Bridge for repairs to damage caused by high truck by Robert Wakeham.

At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of not being a regular user of the Connel Bridge (I plead guilty) I’d like to know why – to the best of my knowledge – there’s no form of overhead warning barrier that triggers stop lights if an overheight vehicle approaches the bridge? This type of ‘fail-safe’ precaution is common enough in some European countries – for example, at level crossings where there’s an overhead electric line.
In this country any construction site involving traffic under low power lines will be legally required to have ‘goalposts’, and it leaves me wondering if the trunk road authority is asleep – or maybe their managing agents get a percentage of the cost of repairing the likes of Connel Bridge? I just can’t believe that the cost of repairs – and disruption – is outweighed by the cost of fitting effective safety warnings.

Robert Wakeham also commented

  • In that case perhaps a reliable stop light system with flashing ‘overheight’ warning would be the obvious failsafe system – the flashing speed signs at the southern entrance to Inveraray and on Great Western Road near Drumchapel are very noticeable.
  • What I’ve seen in some places is a hefty steel pipe suspended from cables over the road – no electrical system to go wrong, but a driver would have to be deaf or drunk not to be aware of a ‘hit’. (having said that, I wonder what was the driver’s excuse at Connel if – as it would appear – he ploughed on for some distance after hitting the first girder?)

Recent comments by Robert Wakeham

  • Astonishing infrastructural deficiency threatens Oban’s business development
    So you’re one of the ‘can’t be done’ brigade – why not, for goodness sake?
  • Astonishing infrastructural deficiency threatens Oban’s business development
    ‘…no new connections have been allowed for years’ – the ‘can’t be done’ school of thought, so easily criticised from the other side of the pond as a British disease, we need this sort of restriction like a hole in the head..
    This is surely a festering scandal, with Campbeltown, Oban and Dunoon contending with varying degrees of geographical disadvantage in the search for healthy local economies.
    It’s a privatised utility, but for all I know it was the same story before privatisation – and do our governments really have no say when this utility is being managed against the public interest?
    Today the energy utilities are reporting huge rises in their profits, so maybe we need a touch of Greek-style re-nationalisation of energy distribution businesses?
  • Astonishing infrastructural deficiency threatens Oban’s business development
    A touch smug, Mr Stanger – there was a hotel on the site before.
    I don’t know whether you live in Oban, but I always wonder at the extraordinary infrastructural deficit in the Oban road network, with just about all traffic between the north and Oban / southern Argyll being funnelled through the ‘bealach’, no sign of a link road around the inland side of the town and the only thing resembling a bypass being the low-speed single track road of extremely limited capacity (and even less passing places) between Connel and Kilmore.
    Add to this the really remarkable lack of proper pavements on some of the busiest streets, and the quite incomprehensible failure to create a link road from the Glenshellach area through the back of Lochavullin to the Albany Street / Shore Street junction, and you’ve got a picture of catastrophic complacency. Or is it smugness?
  • So what has damaged MV Loch Seaforth been up to?
    I was once sitting out on the aft deck of Western Ferries’ ‘Sound of Jura’, returning from Islay on a summer evening, when the boat unexpectedly performed a complete circle – and Arthur Blue emerged from the engine room door, looked around, scratched his head, and disappeared back down the ladder whence he’d come. We soon continued on our way without further incident – these things happen.
  • Communities Secretary on prompt to intervene with revaluation of Castle Toward
    Goodwill? – Dick Walsh?

powered by SEO Super Comments

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Technorati
  • TwitThis
  • Ma.gnolia
  • NewsVine
  • StumbleUpon
  • SphereIt
  • Reddit
  • Slashdot
  • Print

6 Responses to At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of …

  1. At the risk of Ferryman accusing me of not being a regular user of the Connel Bridge (I plead guilty) I’d like to know why – to the best of my knowledge – there’s no form of overhead warning barrier that triggers stop lights if an overheight vehicle approaches the bridge? This type of ‘fail-safe’ precaution is common enough in some European countries – for example, at level crossings where there’s an overhead electric line.
    In this country any construction site involving traffic under low power lines will be legally required to have ‘goalposts’, and it leaves me wondering if the trunk road authority is asleep – or maybe their managing agents get a percentage of the cost of repairing the likes of Connel Bridge? I just can’t believe that the cost of repairs – and disruption – is outweighed by the cost of fitting effective safety warnings.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • What I’ve seen in some places is a hefty steel pipe suspended from cables over the road – no electrical system to go wrong, but a driver would have to be deaf or drunk not to be aware of a ‘hit’. (having said that, I wonder what was the driver’s excuse at Connel if – as it would appear – he ploughed on for some distance after hitting the first girder?)

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • There is also a physical bar to warn drivers but with the lorries stereo on full you might not notice it even if you do hit it. Drivers are supposed to know what the height of their vehicles are and read the signs.

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        • In that case perhaps a reliable stop light system with flashing ‘overheight’ warning would be the obvious failsafe system – the flashing speed signs at the southern entrance to Inveraray and on Great Western Road near Drumchapel are very noticeable.

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          • As linnhe says, there is a recently-installed system of vehicle height sensors linked to NADIX-type display boards/flashing lights, but there have been some ‘teething troubles’ with these.

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


All the latest comments (including yours) straight to your mailbox, everyday! Click here to subscribe.