Karl, Given high prices at the pump maximise HMRC …

Comment posted Who guessed the real point of the ‘jerry can’ fuel panic? by Grant MacDonald.

Karl,

Given high prices at the pump maximise HMRC tax revenues, it is actually not in the governments interest to do anything about them. After all, it’s only the public who are being hurt.

Recent comments by Grant MacDonald

  • Salmond now being rude about the businesses on which Scotland depends
    Thanks for the voice of sanity. I don’t know how these NO campaigners who commented on my post can look at themselves in the mirror. Perhaps too busy giving each other up ticks…

    My wife drew the analogy due to her first marriage to someone who worshipped his Mitsibushi Colt sports car, his external appearance and was happy to let her claim grants from the council to furnish the flat while she also had to ensure clothing comprised her daughters birthday and christmas presents. Obviously, free school meals were a humiliating essential while she had to show him every receipt.
    She also worked two jobs.
    Thankfully, I’ve a step daughter who’s brilliant but is now ensuring her own children do not know who their real grandfather is, something I feel rather sad.

    It appears the NO campaigners here want abuse to leave external scars whereas my wife feels somewhat differently and spotted the disgusting simile between the NO campaign and her own historical situation.

    Or perhaps, they simply thought I was playing politics and consider it a game.

    Regardless, I hope they pause for a second before voting on the 18th to consider their behaviour, their comments, and the corrupt system they are backing.

  • Salmond now being rude about the businesses on which Scotland depends
    Judging by the panicky comments, it seems even the No bodies appreciate how ridiculous the situation is.
    While Cameron. Milliband, & Clegg visited to ‘Love Bomb’ our country, the BBC’s Robert Peston noted that Number 10 staff were ‘corralling the bankers’ to issue simultaneous scare stories.

    And on Thursday, he reports, Cameron hosted senior staff from supermarkets etc to again issue simultaneous scare stories.

    And again, Robert Peston notes, Number 10 worked on Friday to get the phone companies together to frighten the Scots.

    To me, this is the tattooed thug from that poster and rather indefensible. It seems Peston feels the same way.

    Then again, the NO campaigners are supporting this as, it seems, they are supporting a Westminster where the level of expenses claims now exceeds that of before they were exposed. This story cannot be true as I read it in the Telegraph and Daily Mail…

  • Salmond now being rude about the businesses on which Scotland depends
    Those folk considering a NO vote must be proud of their campaign. My wife likened it to that old Domestic Abuse poster with ‘Love and Hate’ tattooed on a thugs knuckles with the question, “Which will it be tonight?”

    The similarity with the NO campaign is painfully obvious as it migrates from Project Fear to Project Terror.

  • Indy: NetNames raises issue of domain names
    A non story of the first order. From forargyll.COM who choose not to use .co.uk …
  • Asset management company advice to Scottish savers, investors and pension pot-holders
    Apparently there is a collection of Better Together and other anti-independence organisations meeting privately in Carlisle this Saturday.

    They are calling it a Gathering of the No Bodies.

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9 Responses to Karl, Given high prices at the pump maximise HMRC …

  1. Hmmmmmm! Indeed. Some people see conspiracy everywhere. I seem to remember that tanker drivers were threatening to strike and hoping to bring the country to a standstill. The advice to keep your tank full and maybe fill a jerrycan was sound. Had the strike gone ahead, forward planning like that suggested would have minimised disruption.

    The fact that people panicked is more a comment on our society, I feel. The result of the overbearing, interfering, nannying government of the past decade and more has been to create a populace unable to think for itself or for us to accept any responsibility as indiviiduals for our own behaviour. A nation of sheep, brought to its knees by the ‘party of the people’.

    I don’t know where all that came from, I haven’t even got a soapbox. :-) I feel better now. :-)

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  2. One things for sure…as oil prices drop, it is not reflected at the pump with either the same haste…or in the long run on par with the price before a peak.

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    • Karl,

      Given high prices at the pump maximise HMRC tax revenues, it is actually not in the governments interest to do anything about them. After all, it’s only the public who are being hurt.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. We understand from our expert source that:
    ‘The fuel price panic provided approximately £1,296,311,000 in early tax revenue to the government. Timed as it was, effectively 4 weeks of fuel were sold in the week before the end of a VAT quarter.
    ‘And also, before the price of Brent Crude dropped. I notice the relaxation has not made its way to the pumps yet.’
    This can be read alongside Tony Gill’s (rational – but this is politics) comment above – and Karl Hughes’s observations on pump prices.

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  4. Happy to let you all know that we have just ordered home heating oil – 9p cheaper than previous and got diesel at Tesco Oban yesterday 5p cheaper than previous – plus a 5p per litre voucher for spending a certain amount on groceries – a win win situation.

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  5. An interesting thought but VAT period ends would be different for every fuel station so not an immediate hit as you suggest. However I would suggest another reason, it was just before the end of a financial qtr where it was touch and go if we would have negative growth or not, by stimulating a petrol spending spree it could have just had the potential to keep growth positive and prevent an announcement of return to recession. In the end it appears it wasn’t quite enough though compelete financial analysis for that qtr has not yet been completed so we wait to see for definite!

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    • This is a very pertinent point. Our source was talking about the financial quarter and it is our mistake that this did not feature in the report. Thank you.

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  6. One minute you accuse politicians of being as thick as two short planks – then you hail them as devious conniving clever dicks. Which ? ? ? BTW – nice one Tony !

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  7. 1. Duty’s going up again soon, isn’t it?

    2. The petrol panic caused a big spike in demand but I don’t think it actually increased consumption. My local garage was lovely and peaceful for days after the stupid happened.

    3. Correlation does not imply causation. Is there actual evidence that this was a conscious decision on the part of the government, or was it an unintended consequence of something else?

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