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Would make a good set for the next …

Comment posted Quarrying at Glensanda: aggregating aggregates by Robert Wakeham.

Would make a good set for the next James Bond movie, but ideally the baddies would disappear into the mincing machine and that would be best achieved as the ship is unloaded and the cargo sinks into the hoppers at the base of the hold.

Robert Wakeham also commented

  • Surely the difference with the wind industry is that it’s creeping over the surface of the country – and the surrounding seas – like some contagion that risks getting out of control, whereas Glensanda is an admittedly very large scale operation but in a carefully chosen area of a landscape big enough to contain it. Yes, it can be surprisingly visible – for example from the road through Glen Nant, 20 miles away – but it’s surely not the ‘total destruction of a huge swathe of countryside’, and it does have a certain grandeur in its sheer scale.

Recent comments by Robert Wakeham

  • With Heb Isles in for repairs, CalMac charters replacement vessel to reduce underprovision for Islay
    The update raises more questions:
    1 – if the Finlaggan’s mezzanine deck has ‘inbuilt’ problems, liability might lie with the designer / supplier, if CMAL / Calmac weren’t responsible for the detailed design.
    Maybe the non-performance of the mezzanine deck is the subject of contractual dispute – and, if so, arguably, the cost not only of fixing the fault but in lost revenue etc might not be to the public account.
    2 – It’s easy to assume that an ageing fleet is less reliable, but if adequate resources are committed to maintenance (at increasing cost) to a rigorous standard, and maybe with the accent on preventative maintenance, then surely there’s less inherent risk in running quite a large fleet of ferries with little or no standby resources. The increasingly hefty costs of adequate maintenance would which would have the (perhaps politically unwelcome) benefit of making investment in new replacement ships more attractive. Unless, perhaps, they’re discovered to have ‘lemons’ like the Finlaggan’s mezzanine deck.
  • With Heb Isles in for repairs, CalMac charters replacement vessel to reduce underprovision for Islay
    There was (maybe still is?) a small ‘flying squad of’ engineers from Campbeltown who travelled the world repairing faults in ships on the move, and I got the impression that it was good business.
  • With Heb Isles in for repairs, CalMac charters replacement vessel to reduce underprovision for Islay
    I wonder what caused the Hebridean Isles’ heavy contact with Kennacraig pier?
    The Isle of Arran got into trouble in West Loch Tarbert in 2010 when a mechanical failure led to just such a heavy contact with Kennacraig pier, but that was in February just days before she was due into drydock anyway.
    And there must be a question about to just what degree Calmac’s ship breakdowns are simply due to the age of their fleet, if the Finlaggan’s mezzanine deck was inoperable just when it was most needed.
  • Supreme Court finds for appellants on Named Persons
    That ‘someone petty enough…’ is obviously alive, if not well.
  • Luss Estates opens unmanned 24 hour filling station in Luss car park – and Arrochar Mountain Rescue was first user
    A good move – and it joins the considerable number of 24-hour electric car charging points that have been ‘rolled out’ in Argyll in the last few years.

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