I think he’s much less dangerous and has …

Comment posted Commons Culture Committee loses all perspective in Murdoch declaration by newsroom.

I think he’s much less dangerous and has done much less harm than Blair or Straw.
Lynda

newsroom also commented

  • Wouldn’t disagree with any of this – but moral standpoints come a touch rich from politicians who vote through on false premises measures affecting the nation; and who close ranks for party advantage against indefensible wrongs – like the war in Iraq and extraordinary rendition.
    We have no quarrel with the Murdoch judgment, per se (although it is over-egged) but with the source of it – aggravated to a secondary degree by the fact that the committee members’ combined management experience of anything substantial will be on the slender side.
  • As with our utilities and major businesses.

Recent comments by newsroom

  • Tatterdemalion Named Person provision in Children and Young People [Scotland] Act 2014
    The ‘opposition’ largely voted it through.
    While, with the SNP majority it would have gone through anyway, the government likes to look supported in these things.
    The ‘opposition’ members [foolishly] allowed themselves to be persuaded to overcome their fears on the Named Person provision on the promise that this aspect of the Act would not be implemented without further consultation .
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    In our follow up article we will have something revelatory to show about this speed of implementation.
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    There’s an Irish description for the phenomenon you identify. ‘If you throw a stone into a pack of dogs, it’s the one you hit that howls.’
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    He’s an entrepreneur. He’s bought Turnberry. He’s investing in it at a serious level. He spent a lot of money on Balmenie.
    If what may well be, at this stage, a numinous notion is taken seriously by all possible parties, it could be successful.
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    Rather than apply the sniff test, shaking hands on a deal and getting it moving could be the smart way to go.
  • Stepping down at Perth, Salmond tries to validate his failure by latching on to his party’s success
    We don’t think you will find that For Argyll ever said that the Union had ‘won’. Because we have never thought it did. There was simple relief at a respite.
    We believe the Union lost – because it never fought; and lost trust and respect on that account.
    We have said repeatedly that the SNP’s strategic organisation of its indy campaign to ground level and across the country was superb and unmatched – probably unmatchable.
    We have said we believe that the SNP will win new Scottish seats in the 2015 General Election – but no one can determine what the number of those seats will be, because local factors apply.
    We have said that we believe that independence will be in the SNP manifesto for the Scottish Election in 2016; that, unless counter action as yet not in existence materialises successfully, the result of that election will see the party given what it will be entitled to regard as a mandate for another referendum; that we will see another referendum in that term; and that it would be likely to carry.
    For good reason, we would see this as a retrogressive step for Scotland – but we openly recognise the realities.
    Equally objectively – as laid out in the evidence above – we see Alex Salmond as having cost his party an independence which, with a strong performance despite what he did and did not do, it could have won on 18th September.
    Mr Salmond’s megalomania, as evidenced in the Newsweek Europe interview linked in our comment above, is at a stage where it may of interest to clinicians – but is worrying evidence of accelerated personal freefall.
    He has also said that ‘he’ will trade another referendum for SNP support for Labour’s Ed Miliband following the 2015 General Election.
    Nicola Sturgeon has said: ‘I’ll be in charge, and I don’t think he’s in any doubt about that.’SNP rules also put the party leader in charge of ALL elected representatives.
    Mr Salmond does not appear to see it that way. If he is elected to Westminster, he will be a pretty difficult loose canon there for the more measured Ms Sturgeon to control.
    As a side note, it is ironic that Mr Salmond is disclosing ‘his’ tariff for the SNP to support Ed Miliband into UK leadership after the 2015 General Election – when it is the SNP in Scotland who are likely to see to it that Mr Miliband’s Labour will not be in any position to support at that stage. Miliband needs to ‘beware Greeks bearing gifts’.
  • Stepping down at Perth, Salmond tries to validate his failure by latching on to his party’s success
    It is worth noting that – on hard documented evidence – Mr Salmond appears to be in the advanced stages of folie de grandeur, or megalomania.
    In an interview to be published today, 14th November, he has told Newsweek Europe that, in terms of his planned future career as a Westminster MP, he may ‘knock off one or two things for Liverpool and Newcastle’; going on to say – and are you sitting when you read this?: ‘Is ENGLAND [our emphasis] going to be safer IN MY HANDS [our emphasis] or in the hands of this coalition government or of Nigel Farage? Much safer IN MY HANDS [our emphasis].

    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/11/21/interview-alex-salmond-plots-his-next-moves-against-british-state-283751.html

    At this orbital rate, he’ll be out there on Comet Gerasimenko with the Philae landing craft in no time at all. ‘Is it a bird? Is it a plane? It’s SuperAlex’.

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31 Responses to I think he’s much less dangerous and has …

  1. I suppose any politician in a democracy has to try not to alienate the moguls of the news media, with their ability to form public opinion (to put it politely), but it gives those moguls immense power over the workings of democracy.
    There’s a clear risk of abuse and – in the case of the Murdoch dynasty – increasing power in the hands of people who aren’t British citizens, and who cannot be assumed to have the interests of us Brits at heart any more than they do those of the country that made them, the country they’ve grown too big for. That’s not to say they’re unique – from Robert Maxwell through Conrad Black there have arguably been worse, and now we’ve got a pornographer, and more recently a Russian oligarch. Surely there’s a need for some form of closer vetting of people buying themselves influence over our politicians.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • I agree. The BBC and BBC Scotland in particular are often lamentable.
      Only today with a revised schedule Politics Today failed to cover FMQ although there was no clash with Prime Minister’s Questions as Westminster has, apparently, “risen” Instead, we were treated to a long and extremely boring discussion about drought which Andrew Neil assured us was affecting “the entire nation” About time sonebody gave him a ring from Paisley.

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  2. Robert – you and your pals are so verbally aggressive and offensive – what’s wrong with you all ? Anyway far too busy to continue with this so enjoy ! Some good headlines on Salmond in the media today – Cheers !

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Obviously, Simon, you’ve missed the point again. I suppose we should be used to that by now.
    Salmond has been all over all the papers on this issue, mostly front page, so your link is entirely redundant and immaterial.

    Which newspaper had Milliband all over it?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. The Sun, obviously, only not in Scotland.

    I am a fan of the Newspaper Review that takes place at 1130 pm on SkyNews where two assorted media people comment on the newspapers as they are published. Obviously the issues that they cover are the important “metropolitan” ones and I am struck at the variations that appear on the Scottish editions when I see them on my newsagents displays the next morning.

    The Daily Telegraph and the Scottish (sic) Daily Mail regularly and The Times and the Scottish (ha ha) Daily Express frequently carry anti-Scottish Government slants to their front covers. These sell so few copies here that we needn’t be unduly concerned at any influence that they might aspire to.

    The Guardian, though well presented and written, makes few, if any concessions to the Scottish political scene, I suspect that Scottish Labour, while useful at one time, causes them some embarassment, and I am surprised that it sells here at all.

    The Record, bless it, sticks rigorously to the old Labour line apart from Joan MacAlpine once a week, and the other red tops seem much more interested in Simon Cowell than in our one.

    Labour’s sour grapes at losing the support of The Sun seem like a gross over reaction.

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      • Robert,

        I have to confess I have never bought it although it seldom seems to follow the pack and its front pages are mostly original in design and approach.Should I give it a try?

        I don’t buy it myself but I read the P&J closely every day in connection with my work and the Argyll & Bute weeklies but I find FA a very useful source of opinion and reaction.

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        • Worth a try, I think (and I must admit to not reading the P&J though it’s clearly often worth checking (but not always – it seems to have fought shy of some of the Aberdeen city business / politics ‘affairs’ of recent years, maybe for good commercial reasons and supporting Newsroom’s comment ‘as with our utilities and major businesses’)

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  5. The whole report is going to the full House of Commons for a vote. I wonder what way the SNP MPs will vote? Will they follow the Tories through the lobby, agreeing that Rupert is a ‘fit person’ to run a media empire?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  6. Newsroom wrote:
    “Phone hacking, reprehensible as it is, has not lost lives, to the best of our knowledge.”
    The Watson parents from Glasgow would disagree; they contend that thoughtless, groundless, amoral press coverage can result in death. They shared their tragic story near the start of Leveson’s inquiry. And I believe that there are other victims who would agree.
    But rather than getting into ‘which is the worst of multiple wrongs’, it is, I believe, a defensible position to say: In the regulated business of media ownership, special standards need to apply. And that the selective amnesia displayed by Rupert at least casts doubt on his fitness to run a UK regulated media business where proprietor conduct is open to scrutiny.
    Even football sets ‘fit and proper’ standards. And media companies, given their power and influence, cannot conduct themselves with impunity, as Leveson is showing.

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    • Wouldn’t disagree with any of this – but moral standpoints come a touch rich from politicians who vote through on false premises measures affecting the nation; and who close ranks for party advantage against indefensible wrongs – like the war in Iraq and extraordinary rendition.
      We have no quarrel with the Murdoch judgment, per se (although it is over-egged) but with the source of it – aggravated to a secondary degree by the fact that the committee members’ combined management experience of anything substantial will be on the slender side.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • So Newsroom
        Are all our politicians a parcel of rogues with no moral compass or just some of them? If you blame all of them, then your premise could be that the masses should rise up as one and remove them. Or, on the other hand, just some in the Executive are evil and corrupt and we let the due process of law deal with them. Is this your argument or have I missed the facts that would support your position?

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  7. Whatever the failings of Rupert Murdoch the anxiety of parliamentarians and hacks to condemn him while police investigations are ongoing show a complete contempt for a basic feature of our constitution, the separation of powers. And the rule of law.

    I would rather put my trust in the police and prosecution authorities even with their imperfections than politicians and journalist who are opportunistic in concealing their own misdeeds.

    By all means have a public enquiry after the production authorities have completed their enquiries and justice has taken it’s course but let’s not let politicians undermine the judicial process

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  8. Mairi “I wonder what way the SNP MPs will vote? Will they follow the Tories through the lobby”

    My prediction is they’ll abstain.

    Just as they did way back then – ‘the snp those wonderful politicos that gave you Maggie Thatcher’

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  9. Newsie – this comment is a pile of odure “the committee members’ combined management experience of anything substantial will be on the slender side”.

    So, let analyse what you are saying here – it reads like ‘if someone does not have private sector management experience they are not fit to judge those who do’???

    Is that really what you are saying??

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  10. Simon,
    That simply will not wash and the oft repeated lie does not become any more true from repetition ad nauseum.
    What gave “us” Thatcher was the everwhelming votes of the UK electorate, although Scots remained doggedly unenthusiastic, and the UK electors sadly gave us her more than once.

    The majority verdict of the Culture Committee appears to have been driven by the obsessive Tom Watson, MP, who blythely manages to overlook the long association of Blair/Brown with News International,e.g. the numerous back door visits to 10 Downing Street, the invitation to be Godfather( is that not appropriate?)to one of Bliar’s children, the sudden dash by Blair to attend a Far East Murdoch summit and the sad huff by Brown when the relationship went sour.

    There is an effective Peter Brookes cartoon in today’s Times with Tom Harris stating

    After months of evidence…
    from this vile, corrupt and morally bankrupt company…
    our committee is ready to publish…
    my forgeone conclusions.

    Sadly by following his lead the Committee has effectively ended with its credibility and its deliberations tainted by overstepping its brief and blindly following the party line.

    Needless to state Mr Harris has a book published!

    I note that Jim Sheridan is one of the Labour committee members and that in itself would cause me concern. Those who saw him on Newsnight Scotland on Tuesday night will understand what I mean.

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