Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

Comment posted Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery by Murdoch MacKenzie.

Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

Recent comments by Murdoch MacKenzie

  • Promising start for Kezia Dugdale on North Sea oil as SNP front bench reverts to Salmond’s schoolyard
    Richard, I don’t know where the US is going to magic up all the gas Europe will be short of if Russia decide to turn off our supplies in retaliation.
    Regarding your supply and demand view,I know that the US have increased supplies through cheap fracking loans but the drop in price was too rapid to not have been engineered.
    Here are some views on the situation,

    “According to Rashid Abanmy, President of the Riyadh-based Saudi Arabia Oil Policies and Strategic Expectations Center, the dramatic price collapse is being deliberately caused by the Saudis, OPEC’s largest producer. The public reason claimed is to gain new markets in a global market of weakening oil demand. The real reason, according to Abanmy, is to put pressure on Iran on her nuclear program, and on Russia to end her support for Bashar al-Assad in Syria….More than 50% of Russian state revenue comes from its export sales of oil and gas. The US-Saudi oil price manipulation is aimed at destabilizing several strong opponents of US globalist policies. Targets include Iran and Syria, both allies of Russia in opposing a US sole Superpower. The principal target, however, is Putin’s Russia, the single greatest threat today to that Superpower hegemony.” F. William Engdahl

    “The US must achieve its objectives in Central Asia or forfeit its top-spot as the world’s only superpower. This is why US policymakers have embarked on such a risky venture. There’s simply no other way to sustain the status quo which allows the US to impose its own coercive dollar system on the world, a system in which the US exchanges paper currency produced-at-will by the Central Bank for valuable raw materials, manufactured products and hard labor. Washington is prepared to defend this extortionist petrodollar recycling system to the end, even if it means nuclear war.”

  • Promising start for Kezia Dugdale on North Sea oil as SNP front bench reverts to Salmond’s schoolyard
    There are no winners in an economic war, which is all this is. The NWO need to control Russia and their other efforts have not been very successful. They want to do what Reagan did. The petrodollar gives them control.
    Putin has been building gold reserves from his oil sales and is a much more astute enemy for them.
    The rest of us will suffer while they slug it out.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/louiswoodhill/2014/03/03/its-time-to-drive-russia-bankrupt-again/

  • Promising start for Kezia Dugdale on North Sea oil as SNP front bench reverts to Salmond’s schoolyard
    I don’t agree. What Salmond said would have been true if the price had not been deliberately crashed by the US and the Saudi’s.
    If the price were to stay where it is at present only the remaining Nodding Donkey operations would be viable, the rest would all go bankrupt and we would need to reopen the coal mines, start building steam trains and steamships again until we transitioned to other energy sources. What happens to gas supplies when oilfields are closed down? A lot of our gas comes from the oil producers. What happens when Russia decides to hit back and close the pipelines down? The lunatics behind the oil price crash don’t care what happens to the rest of the world as long as they keep control of the money.
  • Promising start for Kezia Dugdale on North Sea oil as SNP front bench reverts to Salmond’s schoolyard
    Wait till Cameron gets his frackers in.
  • Promising start for Kezia Dugdale on North Sea oil as SNP front bench reverts to Salmond’s schoolyard
    This article talks about the “soft loans” that China make available in developing countries. I saw a Chinese official discussing this on a TV somewhere a few years ago. I think it was happening in South America as that was where the discussion was taking place. It gets them into the country and finds a market for their products, he tried to put it across as charity as in, “we buy a tanker of oil and offer them a hospital or a road as a bonus, we never get involved in the country’s politics”.
    I’ve heard the prisoner slaves allegation many times, and they are not any better off than prisoners, but I don’t know if it is true. When you look at the numbers of them in Africa it would need to be a huge operation. There are billions of Chinese though so I imagine a lot of prisoners.
    When the West’s aircraft were bombing Libya I got the impression that they were deliberately targeting what looked to me like Chinese built structures.
    There is an interesting bit about Chinese money disappearing in Angola mentioned in the article as well. You always hear stories like this in Africa, they are probably not all true but I’m sure many of them are.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africa%E2%80%93China_economic_relations

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9 Responses to Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

  1. Pingback: Argyll News: Glensanda superquarry: a world beyond imagining | For Argyll

  2. There was comment at the time of the fire that the Yeoman ships have the conveyor boom operating from the stern end, immediately in front of (and attached to) the bridge/accommodation block with the engine room below, whereas there are other ships of this type with the conveyor boom operating from the bow, with less risk to the ship in the event of a conveyor belt fire. Easy to be wise after the event, but food for thought.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • As you can see from the photographs, the boom belt assembly is mounted at the accommodation tower – and the lift belt from the bottom belt the cargo holds discharge onto runs up the front face of the accommodation unit.

      Lay logic – but I guess this is the only position that lets them get the height for the lift belt to rise enough to discharge adequately on to the conveyor boom on the necessary volume/speed axis in unloading.

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  3. Pingback: Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery – For Argyll | Cost To Ship

  4. Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
    The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. The 3 newest Yeoman vessels, all have the elevator belt & tower situated next to the main superstructure. Yeoman Brook, the oldest of the fleet, & the CSL vessels that also visit Glensanda have them near the bow.
    It may be that having the tower near the accommodation block gives an improved view ahead, or it may be that it means that there’s better weight distribution & easier routing of services when everything is near the engines. I guess only the designers will be able to give the definitive answer!

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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