Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

Comment posted Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery by Murdoch MacKenzie.

Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

Recent comments by Murdoch MacKenzie

  • Lifeline for wildlife – 5p per carrier bag in Scotland from today
    Who gets the 5p? Is this another tax transferring money from grocery bills to be spent on some greenie quango?
    For 5p they should be able to make a dozed paper carrier bags that can be re-used and as Lundavra says above are biodegradeable. No, it’s all about money, make 1000 plastic bags for a pound and sell them for fifty pounds, Easy Money!
  • Trees for Life awarded £80k for conservation projects in Glen Affric
    Not at all. If you read some of the ancient writings of visitors to the Hebrides, they talk about the cornfields, especially in Lewis. North Uist is known colloquially as Tir an Eorna for the same reason. The villages grew a lot of their own food and had large herds of cattle on the moorland and were surrounded by all the fish that they could wish for.
    They were not subsidised by anyone and were a strong and healthy race of people. All their troubles, like all of Scotland’s, came from King James VI.
  • Trees for Life awarded £80k for conservation projects in Glen Affric
    That’s correct John. Be it history or current events, I don’t take everything I read as being true. I try and make my own judgement.
  • Trees for Life awarded £80k for conservation projects in Glen Affric
    If you’ve ever been on holiday in mountainous countries abroad you can see how people build terraces up the sides of the steepest mountains to grow crops.
    If you go to cleared villages in Scotland you can see the evidence of the way the people cultivated huge swathes of land. Seeing as we’ve drifted to the Isle of Lewis, go to Google Earth and enter into the search bar, 57 59.8′N,6 30.75′W Edit. When I cut and paste this position it lands in the wrong spot, but you can find the correct location with your cursor. MM.
    If you zoom in (or out) you will see clearly the runrigs that have not been worked for two hundred years. Despite the damage that sheep and deer can do they have survived as witness that the best land was taken from the people, who were given land in other areas that the landlord did not consider worthwhile.
    Robert, the cleared land was the fertile land.
  • Trees for Life awarded £80k for conservation projects in Glen Affric
    John M, – I’ve read about the MacKenzies making a payment to buy out the Fifers rights to Lewis but I’m quite sceptical about it being true.
    The King had sold rights to Lewis to the Fifers thinking that an army of mercenaries would dislodge the MacLeod’s for him but he greatly underestimated his opponent. The MacKenzies had massive resources on their lands just across the Minch and could press a much stronger campaign against the bold Niall. If any money did change hands, I’m sure it would have been at the King’s bidding, to save face.

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9 Responses to Like Robert above, I wondered if there would …

  1. Pingback: Argyll News: Glensanda superquarry: a world beyond imagining | For Argyll

  2. There was comment at the time of the fire that the Yeoman ships have the conveyor boom operating from the stern end, immediately in front of (and attached to) the bridge/accommodation block with the engine room below, whereas there are other ships of this type with the conveyor boom operating from the bow, with less risk to the ship in the event of a conveyor belt fire. Easy to be wise after the event, but food for thought.

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    • As you can see from the photographs, the boom belt assembly is mounted at the accommodation tower – and the lift belt from the bottom belt the cargo holds discharge onto runs up the front face of the accommodation unit.

      Lay logic – but I guess this is the only position that lets them get the height for the lift belt to rise enough to discharge adequately on to the conveyor boom on the necessary volume/speed axis in unloading.

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  3. Pingback: Yeoman Bontrup: the fire and the recovery – For Argyll | Cost To Ship

  4. Like Robert above, I wondered if there would be a change of location for the elevator belt and the boom to the forward end. It’s something that wasn’t mentioned on Thursday, and I didn’t ask either, but I am sure that it would have been considered. It would probably have meant major modifications to the three conveyors that run below the holds to get them operating in the opposite direction. It would also have probably required major structural additions to the forward hull of the ship, to cope with the added torsional forces.
    The cause of the fire was hot work that was being done above the elevator. As there will always be this same danger in the future, they will likely have had safety consultants review their hot work procedures to mitigate against a recurrence. I am sure that the insurance companies and the marine authorities would have insisted on this.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. The 3 newest Yeoman vessels, all have the elevator belt & tower situated next to the main superstructure. Yeoman Brook, the oldest of the fleet, & the CSL vessels that also visit Glensanda have them near the bow.
    It may be that having the tower near the accommodation block gives an improved view ahead, or it may be that it means that there’s better weight distribution & easier routing of services when everything is near the engines. I guess only the designers will be able to give the definitive answer!

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