The vacancy was advertised for several weeks through …

Comment posted First lambs at Auchindrain since 1967 by Bob Clark.

The vacancy was advertised for several weeks through JobCentrePlus – the Government’s official system. After reviewing applications from all over Europe (only a handful of which were from within the UK and even fewer from within Argyll), an open and objective recruitment process selected the applicant with the best mix of experience and skills.

Provided that language ability is not an issue and the applicant is an EC citizen, I do not believe it would be lawful to take an applicant’s nationality into account as a recruitment issue.

Recent comments by Bob Clark

  • Russell congratulates the Wee Pictures on a big windfall
    Many congratulations!
  • Colonialism rules as erstwhile SNP indy partners are shown their place
    Your rudeness is quite appalling. I cannot for the life or me understand why you have not been banned from these pages.

    By all means hold and argue a different opinion, but it is NEVER appropriate to express yourself to people as you do here.

    You should apologise and then keep silent.

  • Parliamentary committee backs preservation of ‘The Tinkers’ Heart’
    Ah, what’s in a name?

    There is much to be found on the internet that analyses the racial, cultural and linguistic background of the travelling people, and one thing that’s certain is that nothing is clear. There has been, and continues to be, “emigration” between the travelling and settled communities in both directions, and the travellers are not a single homogeneous group. In Scotland, for example, there are at least five separate groups who consider themselves different, although in a context where there is little formally-recorded history it is not clear how far back the distinctions go.

    Talking now to Travellers, one gathers that they draw distinctions between themselves as an old community within the British Isles linked by blood and culture, “cousin” groups in the form of the Roma of Eastern Europe, and what Jade calls “new age” people, who are felt to be individuals or families from the settled world who have chosen to adopt aspects of traveller lifestyle but who are culturally different.

    Each region of the settled world has had its own words to describe the travellers, and in the other direction words like “Traveller”, “Romany” and “Gipsy” seem to have been down to individual group customs. The term “tinker” is of its origin a settled-world descriptor for these people, which appears to be a borrowing from Gaelic into Scots and English based on the word “ceàrd”, which is possibly equivalent to the old English word “wright” and broadly-speaking means someone who makes or fixes things. From that it’s simple: “tin-ceàrd”, one who works with tinplate, referring to the fact that in the past one of the common Traveller skills used to earn money was repairing pots and pans. And thence to “tinker”.

    The problem with descriptors like this is that they too often ended up being used pejoratively, with negative associations that were understood by both speaker and hearer. Other minority communities faced the same challenge, and either had to reclaim a word and overlay on it a new and positive meaning, or invent a new one. Thus, the culturally-neutral present-day usage is often “Traveller”. At Auchindrain, however, “the tinkers” were always welcome and honoured, and the term had no negative overtones: so, tinkers they were and tinkers they remain.

  • Parliamentary committee backs preservation of ‘The Tinkers’ Heart’
    We understand that cash would not be likely to be an issue, if no grants or public funding were to be available. It appears possible that the current landowner may be unsympathetic, and that the suggestion that the Heart be Scheduled was in response to this.

    Sketches we have seen confirm that the focus is on a piece of ground the size of a domestic living room, together with an access path, and on the principle that control over and responsibility for the Heart would pass in perpetuity to the Travellers themselves. The thinking would appear to be that only in this way would it be possible to eliminate the risk at some future time of a landowner destroying the site.

  • Parliamentary committee backs preservation of ‘The Tinkers’ Heart’
    At Auchindrain we are pleased and proud to offer whatever support we can to the Travellers in their efforts to preserve the “Tinkers Heart”. One particular aspect of what is currently going on may not yet be widely known, although we are aware because we have been asked (and have agreed) to provide logistical and technical support. Representatives of several old Traveller families are currently working their way through the legal process of establishing a new charity with a focus on celebrating their community’s heritage, with preservation of the Tinkers Heart being a key immediate objective. For a community that has traditionally avoided the systems and structures of the settled world, this willingness to join our game shows just how deep the feelings go. We hear stories from the past of people coming from far and wide to the Tinkers Heart for naming ceremonies, marriages and even funerals. The pattern of stones in the ground marks the spot, but it is the location which is special to the point of being sacred.

    From our own experiences, Historic Scotland cannot be presumed to be being consciously unhelpful, because when it comes to providing statutory protection to sites, monuments and buildings that are part of Scotland’s national heritage they are required to work within legislation that does not always accommodate all the challenges that arise. The correspondence we have seen does NOT say that the Heart is of insufficient significance to be worth preserving. Rather, it indicates that Historic Scotland do not feel that its physical nature meets the legal definition of a piece of land that can be made the subject of a Scheduling decision.

    The challenge here is that the Heart’s importance to the Travellers – and thus, we would argue, to everyone – is more intangible than physical, and current Scottish legislation struggles with that concept. UNESCO has long acknowledged the importance of the world’s Intangible Cultural Heritage. Since 2006 there has been an international convention in force, under which there is an inscribed List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity: you can find it here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNESCO_Intangible_Cultural_Heritage_Lists: it starts with Albania and ends with Zimbabwe. Unfortunately, the UK Government has not ratified the Convention, as can be noted on the UNESCO UK website: http://www.unesco.org.uk/convention_on_safeguarding_of_the_intangible_cultural_heritage_(2003).

    We may thus suggest that fundamentally this is a political issue, and needs to be approached as such. Historic Scotland can only work with the legislation it is given, politicians make the law, and those of us working within heritage who recognise that the value and significance of the intangible is every bit as important as the physical have to operate within a framework which does not agree because of the position taken at UK level in relation to the relevant UNESCO Convention.

    That said, where there is a will there is a way, and the Travellers to whom we have spoken are quite clear about the need to preserve the Heart by Moving Minds – the minds of those who make the law.

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4 Responses to The vacancy was advertised for several weeks through …

  1. Glad Karol seems to be doing a good job, but couldn’t they have got someone Scottish to be in charge of the agricultural activities at the township?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • The vacancy was advertised for several weeks through JobCentrePlus – the Government’s official system. After reviewing applications from all over Europe (only a handful of which were from within the UK and even fewer from within Argyll), an open and objective recruitment process selected the applicant with the best mix of experience and skills.

      Provided that language ability is not an issue and the applicant is an EC citizen, I do not believe it would be lawful to take an applicant’s nationality into account as a recruitment issue.

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  2. I have no issues with a Pole doing the job, my question really is answered in the fact that the job was advertised and no-one local, or nearly local was suitable. Does that say a lot about Argyll or Poland?

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

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